Close

recruiting

Culture Chalk Talk: HACK

The WeVue Culture Chalk Talks are quick snapshots into ways you can quickly change the dynamics of your workplace. We share insights on things we’re doing at WeVue to build a stronger team, successes and failings of small and large companies, and culture hacks to encourage more employee engagement and better communication. If you have a suggestion or a question you’d like us to discuss, let us know in the comments. HACK: The word hack has had a serious shift in meaning over the last ten or so years. What used to be a negative term to describe breaking in or stealing information is now a term used to describe how many Fortune 100 companies operate on a daily basis. Hacking is this idea of working fast on small digestible projects that in turn will amount to an overall better product or solution. Hacking something together is the way successful companies build products and troubleshoot issues. This week we talk about the word hack and how this concept has changed the way do business.

Read More

Culture Chalk Talk: Candidate Experience

The WeVue Culture Chalk Talks are quick snapshots into ways you can quickly change the dynamics of your workplace. We share insights on things we’re doing at WeVue to build a stronger team, successes and failings of small and large companies, and culture hacks to encourage more employee engagement and better communication. If you have a suggestion or a question you’d like us to discuss, let us know in the comments. Candidate Experience: When we started WeVue, we made a pact: no candidates that applied to work with us would ever be left in the dark. As young founders, we’d previously gone on interviews we’d spent weeks preparing for. They’d go well, or at least we’d think they went well. We heard the same thing from our friends – the constant complaint that a company simply went dark after an interview. We’ve made following up with every candidate that applies to work with us a part of our culture and our recruiting process. As a result, we’ve had countless candidates tell us, even after taking another job, that they want to stay abreast of what we’re doing and they’re willing to do whatever it takes to help us even though we weren’t the right fit. We’ve made our recruiting process a part of who we are as people – and we try to promote the best potential hires in our communities and to other companies.

Read More

Here’s How to Turn Your Job Descriptions Into Viral Hits

Viral Jobs!

This post was originally published as a guest contribution on Lever’s blog. Lever is the world’s first collaborative applicant tracking system that you and your entire team will love.  Have you ever created a job posting that hundreds of thousands of people go to sleep at night dreaming about? One that breathes new life into your recruiting pipeline with hoards of qualified applicants and bolsters your employer brand in a way you never thought was possible? We’re about to teach you how to turn an ordinary job posting into a candidate-generating machine. Tourism Queensland In 2009, Tourism Queensland, Australia launched a campaign to hire someone for “The Best Job in the World.” With a large salary, free lodging in an expensive villa, transportation, and the role of essentially babysitting the Great Barrier Reef for half a year while living on a tropical island, the job quickly went viral. Tourism Queensland invested $1M  in the campaign; it’s estimated that all told it generated $200M in global publicity for Tourism Queensland. The “job post” was then expanded to Tourism Australia as a whole, and they’ve generated 333,000 job applicants and 40,000 video entries. Does your company get those kind of applicant numbers from a job post? With a title like “Quality Assurance Analyst,” I’m going to assume the answer is no. Google When Google was faced with the problem of how to hire the best engineers in the world, they turned not to the web, but to a massive billboard in Harvard Square that read: […]

Read More

GE Is Not Your Granddaddy’s Company

  This fall, GE is running a series of commercials aimed at showing tech minded millennials that they’re the place to work if you want to make a real impact on the world. GE’s television commercials tell the story of Owen, a millennial software developer and his new job at GE. Owen is excited about his new job at GE, but the conflict in the commercials arises when no one else understands what he is doing at GE or why he’d be working for such a company. Everyone from his parents who present him with a hammer to “build things with”, to his friends who think he is going to be working “on a train” are confused on what Owen will be doing at GE. The goal of these commercials is to change the perception of GE for both the younger and the older generations. GE wants to be known as a cool place to work that also provides value. These commercials do a great job of communicating the message of value and truly speak well to millennials. We’ll be the first to say, you’ll probably be seeing more commercials like these in the coming years as legacy companies battle to remain attractive and relevant to developers like Owen. THIS ISN’T YOUR GRANDDADDY’S COMPANY The first of the three commercials depicted the millennial software developer, Owen, discussing his new job at GE with his parents. This first commercial really sets the stage for GE. They want everyone to know they are […]

Read More